2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Review

We try out Suzuki’s affordable 2022 GSX-S1000 naked bike.

We try out Suzuki’s affordable 2022 GSX-S1000 naked bike. (Joseph Agustin/)

Suzuki aims to lure its die-hard sportbike riding audience with its 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000. The GSX-S is a liter-class size naked sportbike based on Suzuki’s legendary sportbikes. Suzuki has been manufacturing this bike since the 2016 model year. Fast forward to today and this 2022 iteration is the second-generation GSX-S1000.

Starting with the powertrain, this GSX-S1000 continues to use Suzuki’s tried-and-true 999cc inline-four. This engine’s architecture is very similar to the long-stroke GSX-R1000 from the 2005, 2006 model years, though the actual components, the hard parts, cases, camshafts, and the like are all different.

Suzuki has made a number of nice durability enhancements focused on increased combustion efficiency in order to make this engine smoother and more entertaining to ride. What we really like about this 999cc four is the amount of torque it has on tap. Lug it low or rev it high, this engine always delivers a pleasing amount of acceleration force. This gets even better with the OE-fitted electronic quickshifter, which slices through the six-speed transmission without having to work the clutch. We love it.

The frame and swingarm are also based on Suzuki’s older-generation GSX-R1000, though these parts also benefit from subtle improvements. We rode at the racing circuit during a SoCal trackdays open session and were surprised at how adept it is on track.

Upright ergonomics make for a comfortable ride even while melting knee pucks. The suspension may be a little bit older in terms of architecture, but it just plain works. It handles bumps nicely and delivers good comfort on the street, but when you’re leaning on the suspension, the chassis feedback gives you the fun, exciting feeling that sport riding on a well-set-up bike delivers.

Triple-disc hydraulic brakes work well to keep this streetbike’s speed in check. While the GSX-S1000 doesn’t benefit from cornering ABS like some of its competitors, that doesn’t seem to limit how hard you can ride it in the real world.

Ergonomically, we appreciate the wider, taller handlebar, and that the seat has been lowered a tad. These help make the GSX-S1000 a good motorcycle for someone who’s seeking a powerful bike to ride both around town and in the canyons, something that’s simply well-rounded.

A large one-color digital display keeps tabs on vehicle metrics. We like its different appearance compared to other new motorcycles. The lack of full-color graphics is not really a deal breaker. What might be is just how much information Suzuki has wedged into the screen. It’s really hard to read the speedometer and tachometer, and the clock is far too small. There are a lot of decent features on this dash, but they’re very hard to read. Suzuki would do well to streamline its user experience.

After all, it has streamlined the rest of the bike. We weren’t fans of the aesthetics of the oddly shaped original GSX-S1000, but this motorcycle is much more sleek. We appreciate the flatter, angular body panels, and the stacked LED headlamp looks very nice as well as doing a better job of illuminating the road ahead than the halogen bulb setup on its predecessor. They could stand to be a little brighter, but we were happy at the switch to LEDs in the headlights and turn signals.

Overall the 2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 is a hoot to ride, especially on your favorite backroad. It’s a great way to experience the liter-class torque and horsepower of Suzuki’s playful GSX-R-based engine, with its pleasing air induction and exhaust roar. We’re in love with the upright ergonomics package; it’s always good to be extra comfortable while carving corners.

Which brings us to price. Ringing in at $11,299, the GSX-S1000 represents a substantial value, especially for its class. Suzuki is known for giving its riders a lot of value, but in today’s world, $11,300 for a naked literbike is a steal. Considering that Yamaha’s liter-class naked bike is approaching $14,000 for 2022, there aren’t a lot of brand-new motorcycles under 12 grand that have the GSX-S1000′s big-bike capability.

If we were shopping for a new, liter-class bike, we wouldn’t hesitate to check out Suzuki’s GSX-S1000. Even though it doesn’t have some of the fancy features of other nakeds in this category, it just plain works; the engine makes good power, the suspension and chassis function seamlessly, the ergonomics are nice, the features are modern, and the bike has real character. If you’re looking for a fun 1,000cc naked bike that’s not going to break the bank, the 2022 GSX-S1000 is it.

Gear Box

Helmet: Shoei RF-SR

Jacket: Rev’It Tornado 3

Gloves: Rev’It Kinetic

Pant: Rev’It Piston SK 2

Boots: TCX Rush 2 Air

2022 Suzuki GSX-S1000 Technical Specifications and Price

PRICE $11,299
ENGINE 999cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled 4-cylinder; 4 valves/cyl.
BORE x STROKE 73.4 x 59.0mm
COMPRESSION RATIO 12.2:1
FUEL DELIVERY Fuel injection w/ 40mm throttle bodies; ride-by-wire
CLUTCH Wet, multiplate slipper/assist; cable actuation
TRANSMISSION/FINAL DRIVE 6-speed/chain
FRAME Aluminum twin spar
FRONT SUSPENSION Fully adjustable 43mm inverted fork; 4.7 in. travel
REAR SUSPENSION Preload and rebound adjustable shock; 5.1 in. travel
FRONT BRAKES Brembo radial 4-piston caliper, dual 310mm discs w/ ABS
REAR BRAKE Nissin 1-piston floating caliper, 240mm disc w/ ABS
WHEELS, FRONT/REAR Cast aluminum; 17 x 3.5 in. / 17 x 6.0 in.
TIRES, FRONT/REAR Dunlop Sportmax Roadsport 2; 120/70-17, 190/50-17
RAKE/TRAIL 25.0°/3.9 in.
WHEELBASE 57.5 in.
SEAT HEIGHT 31.9 in.
FUEL CAPACITY 5.0 gal.
CLAIMED CURB WEIGHT 472 lb.
WARRANTY 1-year, unlimited mileage
AVAILABLE March 2022
CONTACT suzukicycles.com

Suzuki gives its 2022 GSX-S1000 naked bike a much needed face-lift. It’s a big improvement aesthetically over the previous model.

Suzuki gives its 2022 GSX-S1000 naked bike a much needed face-lift. It’s a big improvement aesthetically over the previous model. (Joseph Agustin/)

Stacked LED headlamps offer a narrower profile while providing improved visibility during night rides.

Stacked LED headlamps offer a narrower profile while providing improved visibility during night rides. (Joseph Agustin/)

The GSX-S1000 proves to be a versatile streetbike.

The GSX-S1000 proves to be a versatile streetbike. (Joseph Agustin/)

The GSX-S1000 continues to source Suzuki’s legendary long-stroke GSX-R1000 engine from the 2005 model year.

The GSX-S1000 continues to source Suzuki’s legendary long-stroke GSX-R1000 engine from the 2005 model year. (Joseph Agustin/)

The rider seat is a tad closer to the ground. As usual, the seat is comfy for long days in the saddle.

The rider seat is a tad closer to the ground. As usual, the seat is comfy for long days in the saddle. (Joseph Agustin/)

In spite of its hefty 472-pound curb weight, the GSX-S1000 is an exceptionally agile streetbike.

In spite of its hefty 472-pound curb weight, the GSX-S1000 is an exceptionally agile streetbike. (Joseph Agustin/)

An LED taillight continues to adorn the 2022 GSX-S1000, however the turn signals are now LED as well.

An LED taillight continues to adorn the 2022 GSX-S1000, however the turn signals are now LED as well. (Joseph Agustin/)

We like the appearance of the GSX-S1000 one-color display. However the fonts are too small and there is too much information packed into too small of a space.

We like the appearance of the GSX-S1000 one-color display. However the fonts are too small and there is too much information packed into too small of a space. (Joseph Agustin/)

We’re big fans of Suzuki’s more sporty ergonomics package.

We’re big fans of Suzuki’s more sporty ergonomics package. (Joseph Agustin/)

The Suzuki rolls on a stout set of hydraulic disc brakes that do a fine job of slowing down the 472-pound GSX-S1000.

The Suzuki rolls on a stout set of hydraulic disc brakes that do a fine job of slowing down the 472-pound GSX-S1000. (Joseph Agustin/)

The GSX-S1000 offers adjustable combined engine power mode and throttle maps via this mode button. Older-style non-IMU-powered traction control is also standard.

The GSX-S1000 offers adjustable combined engine power mode and throttle maps via this mode button. Older-style non-IMU-powered traction control is also standard. (Joseph Agustin/)

The LED headlamps cast a deeper swath of light compared to the previous versions’ halogen bulb setup.

The LED headlamps cast a deeper swath of light compared to the previous versions’ halogen bulb setup. (Joseph Agustin/)

The GSX-S1000 appeals to sport riders seeking a motorcycle that is more comfortable and practical than a GSX-R sportbike.

The GSX-S1000 appeals to sport riders seeking a motorcycle that is more comfortable and practical than a GSX-R sportbike. (Joseph Agustin/)

Suzuki’s GSX-S1000 happily does it all and is perfectly capable of track duty.

Suzuki’s GSX-S1000 happily does it all and is perfectly capable of track duty. (Joseph Agustin/)
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