In an era where naked bike designs have become increasingly bold, the GSX-S750 stands out for its classic design.

In an era where naked bike designs have become increasingly bold, the GSX-S750 stands out for its classic design. (Suzuki/)

Ups

  • Punchy, sportbike-derived engine
  • Stable chassis
  • Three-level TC is adjustable on the fly and retains selection between use
  • Lower end of the price range for middleweight category

Downs

  • No quickshifter or other electronics to keep up with the competition
  • Only preload-adjustable suspension
  • Extra weight compared to competition; slower handling

Verdict

The GSX-S750 is not the most aggressive bike in the middleweight naked bike category, but what the bike lacks in outright performance it makes up for in terms of rock-solid handling, engine performance, and great value.

Overview

While modern naked bikes continue to evolve in terms of performance, technology, and style, Suzuki’s GSX-S750 soldiers on as a bare-bones offering, prioritizing practical performance over towering horsepower and extensive electronics. The result is a motorcycle that works well around town, with just enough GSX-R DNA for fun trips up your favorite canyon road. Credit the GSX-R750-sourced engine, which has been purposefully retuned for low-end torque, and a chassis with a nice blend of stability and front-end feel.

Two versions of GSX-S750 are available. The GSX-S750Z ABS comes with ABS and a little extra pop thanks to the Metallic Triton Blue paint.

Two versions of GSX-S750 are available. The GSX-S750Z ABS comes with ABS and a little extra pop thanks to the Metallic Triton Blue paint. (Suzuki/)

Updates for 2022

There are no major changes for 2022. Aside from recycled and touched-up colors, the only change is a tiny price increase, up $50 from last year for both variants of the GSX-S750.

Pricing and Variants

The base-model GSX-S750 comes in any color you’d like so long as it’s black (Metallic Matte Black No. 2) and retails for $8,549. Suzuki continues to offer the slightly flashier GSX-S750Z ABS for $8,949, with its Metallic Triton Blue/Glass Sparkle Black paint, wheel stripes, and of course ABS.

Competition

Nearly every manufacturer has come to market with a middleweight naked bike of their own, though Suzuki does have a price advantage over nearly every bike in the space.

Other standout middleweight nakeds include the Yamaha MT-09 ($9,499), Honda CB650R ABS ($9,299), and Kawasaki Z900 ABS ($9,399). There are some great options from European manufacturers, such as the BMW F 900 R ($8,995), Triumph Street Triple ($10,945), and Ducati Monster ($12,695).

Sporty to its core, the GSX-S’ inline-four engine is a reworked version of the GSX-R750 powerplant. Changes are intended to boost low-end torque, with power tapering off up top.

Sporty to its core, the GSX-S’ inline-four engine is a reworked version of the GSX-R750 powerplant. Changes are intended to boost low-end torque, with power tapering off up top. (Suzuki/)

Powertrain: Engine, Transmission, and Performance

The GSX-S750′s 749cc inline-four powerplant is derived from the sporty GSX-R750′s, making this the only bike in the category that can trace its roots back to the supersport world. Suzuki notes that the big-bore engine architecture enabled them to use a shorter chassis, which improves handling.

Camshafts are specific to the GSX-S750, as Suzuki specifically tuned this engine for use on the street.

In the most recent test of the GSX-S750, sister publication Motorcyclist wrote, “If you’re seeking usable real-world engine excitement that is enough to get the blood flowing, but not so much to scare you, then you’ll appreciate this powerband.”

Throttle response is smooth and accurate, but as the bike’s cable-actuated clutch lacks a slipper function, smooth hand work is required during high-rpm downshifting.

There’s bound to be some price comparisons between the GSX-S750 and its competition. At $8,549 it is nearly $1,000 cheaper than the MT-09.

There’s bound to be some price comparisons between the GSX-S750 and its competition. At $8,549 it is nearly $1,000 cheaper than the MT-09. (Suzuki/)

Chassis

The GSX-S750 frame is unique in combining elements of a tubular-style and a twin-spar sportbike frame to balance weight, cost, and performance.

The GSX-S750 is very stable, but its 465-pound weight and steering geometry do make it feel somewhat sluggish through tighter sections of canyon road. With a slightly forward cant, there is great feel and understanding of what is happening at the front end.

The KYB inverted fork and link-type shock offer good damping, a plus considering both ends are only preload-adjustable. Prior GSX-S750 tests demonstrated that damping is calibrated on the sporty side, providing responsive handling feel and steadfast stability at the expense of ride comfort over sharp bumps.

Its twin-spar frame may look like it is constructed from alloy, but it’s actually steel. This, too, helps with the sporty and stable riding characteristics, but contributes to the hefty weight. This bike’s 465 pounds is only a few shy of the beefed-up GSX-S1000, which is laden with rider aids.

The GSX-S750’s front brake package was updated in 2018. Overall performance is admirable, though outright stopping power might not be as strong as the competition.

The GSX-S750’s front brake package was updated in 2018. Overall performance is admirable, though outright stopping power might not be as strong as the competition. (Suzuki/)

Brakes

Radial-mounted four-piston Nissin brake calipers squeeze dual, 310mm front brake discs, with a single-piston caliper out back. Power and feel on the brake levers is good, but even so, the brakes struggle to bring the heavy bike to a stop within reasonable stopping distances. ABS doesn’t come standard on the base model, but is equipped on the Z version.

Fuel Economy and Real-World MPG

Fuel economy has not been recently recorded for the GSX-S.

Ergonomics: Comfort and Utility

As mentioned before, the somewhat forward rider triangle seen on the Gixxus gives the rider a great idea of what is happening at the front end. Its sporty ergonomics are not unnecessarily compact, and were comfortable for our 6-foot-2 test rider. The handlebar is nice and wide and the seat is comfortable for daily riding. Suzuki adds that it used a large-diameter, tapered aluminum handlebar to damp vibration.

The dash is a simple rectangular LCD display which includes pertinent information. Traction control levels can be selected via the handlebar switch.

The dash is a simple rectangular LCD display which includes pertinent information. Traction control levels can be selected via the handlebar switch. (Suzuki/)

Electronics

Because the GSX-S750 is equipped with a cable throttle, it does not have ride modes or an up/down quickshifter. It does, however, have Suzuki’s easy start system and Low RPM Assist, making it easy to leave from a stop. An LCD dash informs the rider of the bike’s vital stats, though admittedly looks dated compared to the dash you might find on newer middleweight nakeds. A halogen headlight and LED taillight help the rider see and be seen.

Traction control includes three levels (plus off) to choose from; we found that level 3 holds the reins closer than level 1 or 2, the latter of which puts the linear power to the pavement while still having the rider’s back.

The base model is not equipped with ABS, but for those seeking that rider aid, the GSX-S750Z ABS is available for $400 more.

The GSX-S750 is not the most sporty middleweight naked on the market, but there’s still sportbike DNA in the package.

The GSX-S750 is not the most sporty middleweight naked on the market, but there’s still sportbike DNA in the package. (Suzuki/)

Warranty and Maintenance Coverage

The GSX-S750 comes with a 12-month, unlimited-mileage warranty with option to extend with Suzuki’s Extended Protection.

Quality

The GSX-S’ fit and finish holds up well under scrutiny. A tidy dash and details like anodized fork caps give it a high-quality look and feel behind the cockpit, though the overall design is starting to look a bit dated.

2022 Suzuki GSX-S750 Specifications

MSRP: $8,549 (base)/$8,949 (Z ABS)
Engine: 749cc, DOHC, liquid-cooled inline-four; 16 valves
Bore x Stroke: 72.0 x 46.0mm
Transmission/Final Drive: 6-speed/chain
Fuel Delivery: Electronic fuel injection w/ 32mm throttle bodies
Clutch: Wet, multiplate; cable operation
Engine Management/Ignition: Transistorized w/ electronic advance
Frame: Twin-spar steel chassis
Front Suspension: 41mm KYB inverted fork, spring preload adjustable; 4.7 in. travel
Rear Suspension: KYB shock, spring preload adjustable; 5.4 in. travel
Front Brake: 4-piston Nissin calipers, dual 310mm discs / w/ ABS (Z ABS)
Rear Brake: 1-piston Nissin caliper, single disc / w/ ABS (Z ABS)
Wheels, Front/Rear: 17 in.
Tires, Front/Rear: 120/70-17 / 180/55-17
Rake/Trail: 25.0°/4.1 in.
Wheelbase: 57.3 in.
Ground Clearance: 5.3 in.
Seat Height: 32.3 in.
Fuel Capacity: 4.2 gal.
Claimed Wet Weight: 465 lb. (base) / 470 lb. (Z ABS)
Contact: suzukicycles.com
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