The new Street trio: the Street Triple 765 Moto2, Street Triple 765 RS, and Street Triple 765 R.

The new Street trio: the Street Triple 765 Moto2, Street Triple 765 RS, and Street Triple 765 R. (Triumph/)

What represents both accessible naked-bike styling and budding international sportbike race stardom? The Triumph Street Triple 765, of course.

Editor’s note: We test rode the 2020 MY Street Triple 765 in video form during the 2020 Triumph Street Triple RS MC Commute Review.

A mainstay on the street since 2007, and Moto2 powerplants since 2019, the 2024 Triumph Street Triple 765 lineup is all that’s left of Triumph’s “Street” name. Neo-nomenclature aside, Triumph’s Triple concept continues to deliver both tractable power and attitude at reasonable price points.

For 2024, tradition shall continue in the form of the updated Triumph Street Triple R, the Street Triple RS, and an exclusive run of Street Triple Moto2 Editions. Before breaking things down by model, a look at what they have in common. Primarily that’s the 765cc liquid-cooled 12-valve DOHC inline-triple, which is largely the same across all three models. The base Street Triple 765 R gets a slight bump in horsepower, from 116 to 118 at 11,500 rpm, while the Street Triple RS and Moto2 get 128 hp at 12,000 rpm. They all get a redesigned stainless steel 3-1 header and exhaust system. Likewise, they all share peak torque of 59 lb.-ft. at 9,500 rpm. All three models get quick-shifting, cornering ABS and traction control, slip and assist clutch, and wheelie control.

The Moto2 race program is said to be responsible for a number of engine upgrades. Compression goes up, from 12.65:1 to 13.25:1, while new pistons, con-rods, and gudgeon pins work a revised combustion chamber. (FYI: A gudgeon pin is the wrist pin that holds pistons to connecting rods, with accompanying needle bearings and circlips.) New valves and camshafts also increase power and efficiency, with revised (lower) gearbox ratios rounding things out.

The trio gets a slightly redesigned 3.96-gallon fuel tank, which is actually about 0.7 gallon less than the previous one. The radiator cowling is also redesigned, as are side panels and rear bodywork; Triumph says this is to give the bikes a “nose-down” look.

Now for the differences: Starting with the Street Triple R, wider bars (0.5 inch or 12mm) are fitted, plus a TFT display of sorts. It’s not the 5-inch TFT the RS and Moto2 get and only displays “key information.”

The Street Triple R gets four riding modes, including “rider-configurable.” Technically, that could mean countless different modes, but still, it’s a good thing. One could say the R offers a “more commanding riding position,” or note that the front end has been lowered by 0.7 inch (18mm). Want cruise control? Buyers must bump up to the RS for that.

Colors are a choice between Silver Ice with Storm Grey and Yellow graphics, or Crystal White with Storm Grey and Lithium Flame graphics.

Next up, the Street Triple RS. Now riders get Brembo Stylema four-piston calipers with ABS. Fork  is similar to the R’s 41mm Showa adjustable unit, but there’s a fully adjustable Öhlins STX 40 rear monoshock with about 2.3mm less travel than the R’s Showa unit. Accordingly, seat height goes up by 0.5 inch (12mm).

As mentioned earlier, a full-color 5-inch TFT is part of the package. And on the subject of electronics, the RS gets five riding modes, including Track mode. As might be expected, this mode is meant to be as unintrusive as possible while still offering intervention in critical situations. The RS gets Pirelli Diablo Supercorsa SP V3 tires, as opposed to the R’s Continental ContiRoad tires.

Last, but not financially least, is the limited-edition Street Triple Moto2, which comes with even more track-ready tuning and attitude. In that spirit, the Moto2 features a full complement of carbon fiber bits, including front mudguard, side panels, headlight, and bellypan, plus an individual number machined into the steering stem’s top yoke.

Weight is the same as the RS (414 pounds wet). But a 23.0 degrees/3.75 inches (95.3mm) rake and trail are more aggressive, as is the slightly higher seat height and lower front end (0.1 inch and 0.5 inch, respectively). Exactly 765 models will be made available in their very own choice of color schema. That would be Triumph Racing Yellow with an Aluminum Silver rear subframe or Crystal White with Triumph Racing Yellow rear subframe.

Remarkably, the 2024 Street Triple 765 R is said to start at $9,995. The 2023 MSRP is $10,945. The RS will start at $12,595, or $400 less than the 2023 price. Take that, inflation.

The Street Triple 765 Moto2 will start at $15,395.

The Triumph Street Triple 765 R, winding through un-wintry roads and locales.

The Triumph Street Triple 765 R, winding through un-wintry roads and locales. (Triumph/)

The base Street Triple 765 R’s LCD and (sorta) TFT with “key information” like gearing.

The base Street Triple 765 R’s LCD and (sorta) TFT with “key information” like gearing. (Triumph/)

The Street Triple RS and Moto2 5-inch TFT display, by comparison.

The Street Triple RS and Moto2 5-inch TFT display, by comparison. (Triumph/)

The starboard side of the Street Triple 765 RS, in Carnival Red and Carbon Black.

The starboard side of the Street Triple 765 RS, in Carnival Red and Carbon Black. (Triumph/)

The Street Triple 765 RS showing off track mode and wheelie, simultaneously.

The Street Triple 765 RS showing off track mode and wheelie, simultaneously. (Triumph/)

The limited-edition Street Triple 765 Moto2, shown in Triumph Racing Yellow.

The limited-edition Street Triple 765 Moto2, shown in Triumph Racing Yellow. (Triumph/)

Front view of the Street Triple 765 Moto2, note the bar-end mirrors.

Front view of the Street Triple 765 Moto2, note the bar-end mirrors. (Triumph/)
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